BFL Netball Indigenous and Multicultural Round and CHFL Netball.

BFL Netball Indigenous and Multicultural Round and CHFL Netball. BALLARAT Football League Indigenous and Multicultural Round.Redan V East Point.Lauren Jew (East Point)Pic Lachlan Bence.
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BALLARAT Football League Indigenous and Multicultural Round.Redan V East Point.Monica Van Dyk (East Point)Pic Lachlan Bence.

BALLARAT Football League Indigenous and Multicultural Round.Redan V East Point.Marcelle Geljon (East Point)Pic Lachlan Bence.

BALLARAT Football League Indigenous and Multicultural Round.Redan V East Point.Cassandra Peace (Redan) Pic Lachlan Bence.

BALLARAT Football League Indigenous and Multicultural Round.Redan V East Point.Ruby Parry(Redan) Pic Lachlan Bence.

BALLARAT Football League Indigenous and Multicultural Round.Redan V East Point.Emma Henry (Redan) Pic Lachlan Bence.

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Child injured in quad bike accident at Veresdale

A seven-year-old girl was airlifted to the Mater Children’s Hospital after a quad bike accident at Veresdale on Saturday. Photo courtesy of RACQ CareFlight Rescue.A SEVEN-YEAR-OLD girlwas airlifted to hospital with suspected head, spinal and abdominal injuries following a quad bike accident at Veresdaleon Saturday afternoon.
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The girl was injured aftercomingoff the quad bikeand falling about one metre to the ground at about 12.30pm.

Beaudesert fire fighters, police, two ambulances and the advanced care unit attended the scene.

RACQ CareFlight Rescue helicopter airlifted thechild to Mater Children’s Hospital in a stable condition.

RACQ CareFlight Rescue’s Toowoomba helicopter was dispatched from the Clive Berghofer CareFlight Centre shortlybefore 1pm.

The crew landed at a private property at Veresdale within 30 minutes.

The Critical Care Doctor and Flight Intensive Care Paramedic on-board the chopper assessed and treated the girl’s injuries on scene and reported her to be in a stable condition.

A seven-year-old girl was airlifted to the Mater Children’s Hospital after a quad bike accident at Veresdale on Saturday. Photo courtesy of RACQ CareFlight Rescue.

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Popular Mount Clay picnic and camping area re-opened.

The Sawpit Picnic area and campground has been re-opened after it was burnt during April’s Bushfire. Picture: ROB GUNSTONEA POPULAR picnic and camping area in the Mount Clay State Forrest has re-opened after being damaged in April’s bushfire.
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The Department of Environment and Primary Industries (DEPI) re-opened the Sawpit picnic area and camping ground in the Mount Clay State Forest, north-east of Portland on Friday.

It had been closed since April 2, when a bushfire tore through the state forrest and threatened nearby Narrawong.

DEPI acting planning manager for the far south-west James Downie said saftey concerns had kept the area closed.

“We’re really pleased that all sections of the camping area, including the toilets, shelter and fireplace facilities, are now open,” he said.

“Whaler’s Lookout Walk is also open but the Mount Clay Mountain Bike Track is still temporarily closed.”

Visitors to the area are asked to observe and follow any signage about remaining restricted areas, as well as being mindful of potential dangers such as falling trees.

“While there’s lots to enjoy that’s accessible, much of the area is still fire-affected, so we ask that visitors not leave the designated campsite areas or formed walking tracks for their safety,” Mr Downie said.

“Visiting Mount Clay State Forest promises not only beautiful scenery but a chance to see how our forests recover after a fire.”

For more information contact DEPI on 136 186.

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Paris postcard from 12-year-old future tennis ace

Not everyone can be a Martina Hingis, the Swiss prodigy who was winning junior grand slam titles at the age of 12 and her first senior Australian Open at 16. But nor does every 12-year-old fly to Paris to hit with the Wimbledon champion and contest a tournament in front of the Eiffel Tower against some of the world’s young elite. Welcome to Olivia Gadecki’s week, in which the Gold Coast schoolgirl had her first taste of escargot, and her second of international tennis, starred in a feature story on Australian breakfast TV, and competed on a specially constructed clay court with a view stretching all the way down the Champ de Mars. On Thursday, she won her first match in the Longines Future Tennis Aces tournament, beating Japan’s Himari Sato from a set down. In the quarter-finals, she was outmanoeuvred by Poland’s Maia Chwalinska and was therefore unable to emulate Victorian Destanee Aiava, who won the whole thing the last time it was a girls’ event, in 2012. Which is hardly the point, though. Far from it. Predicting how someone so young will fare as a player and person is an impossible task, with valuable experience being just one of the many factors that will help shape the future.  ”From being a 12-year-old, then being a teen at 15 and 16, and being an adult, I mean the process is so long that sometimes you can easily lose the way a little bit,” says Marion Bartoli, who earlier traded backhands, and questions, with the 16 invitees at the Longines Academy. The potential pitfalls are many. Physically, some bodies are more fragile than others, and the same goes for minds. ”Or for some girls, it’s not what they want, so they are switching direction at 15 or 16,” says Bartoli. ”Anything can happen, really. It’s extremely difficult to say. What I know is, I was by far not a very good player at 12 and still became a champion, so every path is possible, and as much as you want to be a tennis player, if it’s really what you dream for every single day, you have a good chance to be one.” Gadecki is dreaming big. The only sister among five brothers raised by a Ukrainian-born mother, Natalia, she has played tennis since she was three, and is ranked first in her age group nationally. Globally, her exposure was limited to a five-week European tour last year, before this trip, which will end with a tournament in Barcelona with coach Adam Carey. In Paris, the young competitors were a broad mix of sizes, shapes, styles, and developmental stages, with Gadecki among the tallest and most powerful. Just weeks after her 12th birthday, she is already 173 centimetres, and thus conforming to the modern women’s prototype of big and ball-bruising. But there is much more to it, for it is not just about how hard, but how, and many more twists lie ahead. ”Olivia’s definitely very committed, and she’s definitely very serious about her sport, but she’s got a long way to go,” says Carey, who is based at the National Academy in Queensland. ”And just the nature of the game these days, a lot of these players are deep into their 20s before they have a lot of success, so you’re talking about a 10-year journey. It’s just about keeping it really fun, getting her to enjoy her tennis, getting her to keep growing and learning, and then we’ll see where we’re at after all that.” Bartoli’s message: ”To play with a smile, to enjoy themselves – they are only 12, so they are just kids and innocent, so take the most out of this amazing opportunity and enjoy this time, because playing in Paris, under the Eiffel Tower, next to the French Open, I mean this is an amazing chance.” Gadecki already contests 20 to 30 less glamorous tournaments each year, travelling for a maximum of 15 weeks to allow time for school, family, and normal things. She has a racquet sponsor and an academy scholarship worth well over $50,000, but she is not Martina Hingis, and her more contemporary idol is Victoria Azarenka anyway. Still, she enjoyed the adventure more than the snails, and already has a fair idea of what she wants to be doing in five, perhaps 10, years. ”I’d like to be playing the French Open against some good players, and maybe some of these girls,” she said. ”And winning.”  Linda Pearce is in Paris as a guest of Longines.
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Hong Kong’s outspoken media chiefs are facing growing intimidation

Members of The Hong Kong Journalists’ Association, Staffs of Ming Pao and supporters hold a banner displaying “They Can’t Kill Us All” following the brutal attack on former chief editor of the Ming Pao newspaper Kevin Lau. Photo: South China Morning PostWhen somebody rammed a stolen car into his Kowloon home last June and neatly placed an axe and meat cleaver in front of the battered gate protecting his wife and son, Jimmy Lai’s reporters instantly ran the story on Lai’s irreverent and extraordinarily popular Apple Daily website.
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While police struggled to find the attackers or uncover a motive, Lai’s reporters pointed to splenetic attacks on their boss in Communist Party-controlled newspapers.

And when Lai’s Next Media Group suffered three further Triad-style attacks in quick succession – ahead of planned pro-democracy protests – the group uploaded an entertaining video re-enactment which showcased the group’s celebrated animation artists and underscored why political opponents might want to shut him down.

”The attacks have been increasing in frequency as the annual pro-democracy rally and anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover to China approaches on July 1st,” said the video report, noting that the string of attacks ”has not slowed production nor intimidated Jimmy Lai”.

This year, however, as the sensitive July 1 anniversary of Hong Kong’s handover to Beijing again approaches, Lai faces a different kind of threat. Now it is Western financial institutions – banks steeped in the laws and freedoms of the British Empire – that stand accused of trying to bring Lai’s Hong Kong media business to its knees.

”They’ve got the Chinese running their business,” says Mark Simon, a senior Next Media Group executive, who is also managing director of Lai’s personal trust. ”It’s Putinesque.”

Hong Kong, the speck of land that the British Empire appropriated from the Qing Empire after the Opium Wars, has long succeeded in absorbing what it wants from both East and West. Financiers, writers, refugees and even members of the Chinese Communist Party underground have all flocked to shelter under the protective umbrella of British institutions at the gateway to mainland China.

In 1984, when Margaret Thatcher agreed with Deng Xiaoping to return Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty in 1997, she placed great faith in Deng’s formula of ”one country, two systems”, which would ”remain unchanged for 50 years”. But as Hong Kong’s self-imposed 2017 deadline for universal suffrage draws closer, it seems she may have underplayed Deng’s crucial qualification: the city’s administrators must first be ”patriots” before they can be trusted to ”autonomously” run Hong Kong.

”A patriot is one who respects the Chinese nation, sincerely supports the motherland’s resumption of sovereignty over Hong Kong and wishes not to impair Hong Kong’s prosperity and stability,” said Deng, according to official accounts.

”Those who meet these requirements are patriots, whether they believe in capitalism or feudalism, or even slavery.”

Senior leaders, particularly a security chief called Tao Siju, made clear they could work with tycoons, professionals and even triads provided they were patriotic.

One patriot is King’s College-educated urban surveyor C.Y.Leung, who is now chief executive of Hong Kong. His challenge, since coming to power in 2012, has been to straddle the divergent objectives of patriotism, as defined by Beijing, and ”two systems”, as understood by Hong Kong’s 7 million people.

By then, the proportion of Hong Kongers who identified mainly as ”Chinese” had fallen to a record low.

Leung’s first move was to implement a ”patriotic education” curriculum in the city’s schools. When the first patriotic textbooks were distributed, however, tens of thousands of parents, students and civil society activists swarmed onto the streets and their grievances were given fulsome coverage in the independent press.

”We don’t need no thought control,” said one placard, in the Pink Floyd-themed demonstrations. The patriotic education program was withdrawn but the quest to create a more patriotic media has gathered pace.

”The gloves are off,” says senior finance journalist Shirley Yam, who is vice chair of the Hong Kong Journalists Association. ”The Party has always tried to impose its will, but now the way they do it is more brutal and direct.”

Jimmy Lai’s Next Media Group was not always known as a bastion of fearless journalism in Hong Kong. For decades that honour belonged to the Ming Pao newspaper stable, founded in 1959 by the legendary fiction author and political commentator Louis Cha.

Like other leading newspapers including the South China Morning Post, Ming Pao is battling against declining ad revenue and ownership has long since shifted to mainland-dependent business people who hold seats on Beijing’s quasi-legislative bodies.

But Ming Pao’s core of intrepid investigative reporters and their esteemed editor-in-chief, Kevin Lau, have maintained strong coverage of pro-democracy demonstrations and broken a slew of stories that infuriated powerful people, including leaders in both Beijing and Hong Kong.

”We maintained our traditions,” said senior Ming Pao reporter Phyllis Tsang.

In January this year, however, when rumours swirled around the Ming Pao newsroom in Chai Wan, Lau gathered his loyal staff to confirm that he was being replaced.

”We were all shocked,” says Tsang, recounting the events that led her to co-found the Ming Pao Staff Concern Group. ”He answered our questions very calmly and told us what he knew, and much more of what he didn’t know.”

The new editor was relatively unknown, except for a commentary he had written in support of ”patriotic education”.

On February 26, after thousands of protesters had taken to the streets in defence of media freedom, two men on a motorbike tailed Kevin Lau as he drove from his Kowloon home to Ming Pao headquarters, where he had been reassigned to a bookkeeping role.

When Lau stopped for breakfast in Quarry Bay, one of the men dismounted the bike and planted a meat cleaver deep into both sides of his upper back, exposing his chest cavity but stopping just short of his lungs. Four more chops were directed above and below both knees, severing the main nerves that enabled him to walk.

This time, 10,000 Hong Kong protesters took to the streets. They held banners that read: ”They can’t kill us all.”

Lau’s alleged assailants have since been detained across the mainland border. But, as with Jimmy Lai and several other Triad-style assaults on independent-minded journalists, neither motive nor mastermind has been discovered. Ham-fisted comments by Hong Kong’s police chief have encouraged allegations that this was a crime that he could not afford to solve.

”Before the truth is revealed, it is bewildering for the commissioner of police to have said there had been no direct evidence to suggest the assault was related to any journalistic work,” Lau said from his hospital bed.

”I stated that my family members and I are not involved in any financial, extramarital or other personal disputes. I am, therefore, positive that the assault is related to my job in the newspaper.”

Surgeons have had no success in connecting the nerve in one of Lau’s legs, according to friends of the family.

No motive or mastermind has been uncovered. But the spate of triad-style attacks on journalists has galvanised Hong Kong’s pro-democracy movement and attracted attention from abroad.

In April, US Vice-President Joe Biden pledged to resume congressional ”reporting” after meeting respected democracy leaders (whom pro-Beijing party newspapers promptly branded ”traitors”).

”We are very aware of the Hong Kong situation and we do not want to end up like that,” says Po-hua Liang, editor-in-chief of Taiwan’s Commonwealth magazine. ”Apple Daily is all that is left.”

Apple Daily founder Jimmy Lai wasn’t fazed in 1994 when Beijing squeezed his hugely profitable clothing business from the mainland and choked the flow of Chinese advertising revenue after he wrote a critical commentary. Indeed, it freed him to establish the gaudy, salacious and iconoclastic tabloid that grew to make his name.

Unlike Ming Pao, Lai’s relentlessly innovative media business is designed to survive the vicissitudes of mainland China and also the death of print.

”In April last year he called in our editors and executives and said, ‘Eventually print is going to die and the whole newsroom has to go digital’,” says Daisy Li, a former internationally acclaimed Ming Pao journalist who now heads Lai’s digital operations in Taiwan.

Since then, says Li, traffic to the Hong Kong website has surged to more than 20 million page views each day, plus about 10 million news and animation video views.

What Lai didn’t plan for, however, is that his three biggest financial sector advertisers might desert on mass.

”The damage they are doing to their reputations is phenomenal, ” said Next Media’s Mark Simon, naming HSBC and Standard Chartered.

He says those two banks, both dual listed in London and Hong Kong, spent $HK28 million-$HK29 million (about $A4 million) advertising with Next Media in the year to September but neither has placed any ads since.

Simon says account managers at the banks have apologetically explained that they were implementing instructions from managers who were pressured by pro-Beijing officials.

A spokeswoman for Standard Chartered said she would not comment on what she called ”market rumours”. HSBC and another former advertiser, the Bank of East Asia, both said their advertising strategies were shaped by commercial requirements.

Jimmy Lai, who has dedicated his business to the prospect of ”free China”, has no intention of allowing multinational bankers to succeed where Triad-style attackers have not.

”We will make money,” says Simon, pointing to a statement to the Hong Kong Stock Exchange that foreshadows a return to profitability in the year to March.

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Weekend could be wetter than the entire month of May

After a dry May, more rain may fall weekend than fell the entire month. Photo: Kristjan PormGet out those brollies – for a day at least.
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This weekend may be the wettest since November with Sydney to collect as much as 20 millimetres of rain on Sunday.

Coastal regions to the city’s south may get as much as 50 millimetres, said Ben Domensino, a senior meteorologist at Weatherzone.

“There’s a chance we’ll get more rain this weekend than the whole month of May,” Mr Domensino said.

In May, the city’s rain gauges collected about 30 millimetres of rain, or less than a quarter of the long-run average.

Autumn was on the dry side, too, with about 70 per cent of the usual rain.

Temperatures, though, should see little retreat from the spell of above-average warmth.

Saturday passed 20 degrees early during the afternoon, making it 28 consecutive days above that threshold – easily longer than the previous longest such spell of 19 days set in 1947, according to Bureau of Meteorology data.

For now, Sydney is tipped to have a maximum of 20 degrees on Sunday, with forecasts for another five days of 21-23 tops out to next Friday.

June’s average maximum is 16.9 degrees.

As with the previous belts of unseasonably mild weather, a dominant high-pressure system squatting over the Tasman is largely responsible for the warmth.

This coming week’s system, though, will be a bit further south than its predecessors. As a result, Sydney will get more on-shore winds bringing showers on most days, Mr Domensino said.

That high should keep cold fronts well to Sydney’s south, signalling the mild conditions could run for at least another two weeks, he said.

That outlook will be welcomed by Sydneysiders keen to avoid wintery weather as long as possible – but not by those hoping for a decent dump of snow to get the ski season underway.

Next weekend is the Queen’s Birthday long weekend.

While mountain peaks may get the odd snow flurry, the white stuff is unlikely to last and temperatures will be too warm for the snowmakers at the Alpine resorts, Mr Domensino said.

Weatherzone is owned by Fairfax Media, publisher of this website.

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Street art at The Quays comes under attack by owners corporation member

Respected street artist Adrian Doyle, before his disputed mural. Photo: Angela WylieAs loading bays go, there can’t be many more colourful, vibrant or intriguing than the one at the Quays, a new apartment development in Docklands. But like beauty, sacrilege, it seems, is in the eye of the beholder.
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One resident of the building is so offended by the two wall murals by Adrian Doyle that she has demanded they be painted over. Immediately.

If they are not, she claims, she will be ”pursuing this matter formally through the Human Rights and Equal Opportunity Commission and the media”.

Along with a yet-to-be-installed sculpture by Callum Morton, the murals from Doyle, the entrepreneurial street artist behind the Blender gallery and Melbourne’s street art tours, were commissioned by the building’s designers, McBride Charles Ryan. Doyle was paid about $10,000 for the works, which took him and an associate about a month to complete.

On Tuesday night, the owners corporation heard a submission from the resident, a lawyer, that the works are sacrilegious (one features a depiction of a Christ figure crucified on a telegraph pole) and racially offensive (the other features an infant crying; the complainant has interpreted this child as being indigenous, though Doyle insists she is not). She has also taken issue with an image of a woman hanging out the washing.

”These images in the context of the entire mural depict Australia, in particular Docklands and our building, as a Christian-hating, sexist, racist and oppressive society,” the resident wrote. ”These images ridicule the Christian faith and degrade women and I am disgusted to think that this is what members of the public would think the residents of the Quays support.”

Doyle had already agreed to replace the face of the Christ figure – modelled on his own father, and meant to represent ”all that he sacrificed for me” – with a Ned Kelly mask, but is resisting all other efforts to alter his work. The owners corporation is understood to be taking the matter very seriously.

For Doyle, there’s a certain irony in all this. No shrinking violet, he most recently courted attention last September when he painted the entirety of Rutledge Lane, which runs into the more famous Hosier Lane, pale blue, obliterating the work of many of his fellow street artists.

”Yeah, of course I see the irony in the situation,” he says. ”But that was a very different context. I wasn’t going over major artworks. Some people might argue against that, but it’s true.”

That gesture – which had the support of lord mayor Robert Doyle (no relation) and some street artists, but drew opprobrium from others – was about rejuvenation. His ”work” – he called the colour ”nursery blue”, and describes it as ”representing my nephew Beau, who drowned in our family swimming pool” – was never intended to last. Within 45 minutes, the first tags had begun to appear on top of it.

The murals at the basement of the Quays are a different matter. Like his 49-metre-long wall mural outside Crown – officially unveiled by Robert Doyle in June 2012 – it is a serious work that explores the suburban dream. The Christ figure is meant to be his father, ”because of all he sacrificed for me”. The Howard Arkley-style house is, he says, modelled after his nanna’s. The coastline is his home town, Frankston.

It’s not hard to see how those images might resonate in an environment that has, for many, supplanted the traditional notion of home ownership in Australia. And several residents have in fact written to Doyle to express their support.

”It is meant to ruffle a few feathers,” Doyle says of his work, but ”I’d be very upset if it got painted over.

”I’ll go all the way with it if I have to,” he adds defiantly. ”If they want to take it to the court, I’ll just have to do it.”

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Cooper’s brood of Sydney Swan supporters

Buddy beautiful: Bloods legend Nell Cooper relaxes at her home in Broadmeadows. Photo: Jason SouthThey call her Nellie Swan or “Mrs Sydney” around the neighbourhood, and they are monikers that speak to Nell Cooper’s love for her club, but not to her location. Her team may be harbourside, but home is Broadmeadows, and that’s where she was on Thursday night when her boys smashed the Cats at the SCG.
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As club milestones go – an all-time record thrashing of Geelong – it was momentous, and one of the few landmark moments Mrs Cooper has missed seeing live in the better part of a century. She’s 85, reckons she would have been taken to see South Melbourne at Lakeside Oval as a baby. Today she is considered a Bloods legend – one of the esteemed Ladies of the Lake.

“I’m a Blood. Always a Blood,” she says, though at times it hasn’t been easy.

The worst of days came in the early 1980s, when a club in strife was shipped to Sydney, the advance party in the-then VFL’s national expansion. “I remember we took a coffin to the ground, it was like the club was dying.” Many supporters wavered, but not Nell – though she says had they abandoned the red and white stripe of legend she would have been sorely tested.

But the colours, and some of the old spirit, survived. It took a while, but when it was reignited it was done in high emotion amid the thrill of a grand victory with the Swans 2005 premiership – their first in 72 years. Nell was barely walking when they’d last won in 1933. The modern champions dedicated that win to the old Lakeside spirit.

“That’s what Kirky [Brett Kirk] said: ‘This is for you’. I don’t think we stopped crying for a week. We’re very lucky with our players. One thing we get more than the Victorian clubs is we meet the players. We have a couple of events after the game and the players will talk to you. A lot of people envy us that. It brings the kids in, the kids get to meet their idols.” Among the youngsters to have shaken hands with their heroes are Mrs Cooper’s brood of young Swans, now stretching to a third generation. Eight of her 13 grandkids are fans, and she jokes: “I’m not a very nice person. At Christmas time the ones who support us get an extra nice present.”

With devotion this unshakeable, cynicism does not intrude – not even when the club signed Hawk Buddy Franklin to a $10 million deal.

“I love Buddy,” she declares.

She found herself endlessly defending Sydney’s outlandish outlay of money even though she still works to get to matches.

“I deliver the local paper and junk mail round here – that’s the money that gets me to Sydney for matches,” Mrs Cooper says.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Coastal football updates

TSL
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Devonport vs Western Storm

Full time:

Western Storm 20.18.138 Devonport 8.9.57.

Three goals each to Shaun Collins and Alex Russell lead the way for Storm, while Adam Flannery and Brent Guerra kicked two each for the pies.

Third quarter:

Western Storm 16.14.110 Devonport 8.5.53

Western Storm extend the margin after the main break, kicking five goals to two.

Going to be a tough slog in the last term with steady rain falling.

Half time:

Western Storm: 11.8.74 Devonport 6.3.39

Western Storm’s forward line pressure is outstanding, resulting in several goals.

Quarter time:

Western Storm 5.1.31 Devonport 4.3.27

Great contest in the opening quarter between the two sides, with the Storm holding out a four point lead.

Plenty of bruising tackles from both teams, especially from Magpies guest player Brent Guerra.

NTFL

Wynyard vs Penguin

Full time:

Wynyard 28.15 (183) Penguin 4.6 (30).

Full forward Gregg Sharman finishes with 15 goals to lead the Cats to a whopping 153 point victory against the Two Blues.

Third quarter:

Wynyard 23.11 (149) Penguin 3.3 (21)

Gregg Sharman is doing it all at the moment.

From taking pack marks, to crumbing and to palming off assists.

He has 12 goals to his name at the three quarter time to steer the Cats to a mammoth 128-point advantage.

Kullum Kubicki and Zac Smith the major ball winners.

Two Blues look disinterested since their fall behind in the first term.

Half time:

Wynyard 14.9 (93) Penguin 3.2 (20)

Cats continue the on-slaught in the second quarter, ramming home six goals to the visitor’ solitary major to all but seal the victory with a 73 point buffer.

Wynyard full-forward Gregg Sharman, who escaped penalty at teh tribunal on Thursday, has booted six goals to half time.

Quarter time:

Wynyard 8.2 (50) Penguin 2.1 (13)

After conceding the opening goal, the Cats kick eight goals in the first term to take a 37-point advantage at quarter time.

Gregg Sharman has booted three while co captain Zac Smith (two goals) is feeding the forward line.

Latrobe vs East Devonport

Full time:

Latrobe 34.31.235 East Devonport 8.9.57

Sculthorpe finishes with eight, Holland and Jeffrey with four each.

Swans backman Chris Poole drifted forward to kick a rare goal in the last minutes.

A rare highlight for the Swans who tried hard but were outclassed

Third quarter:

Latrobe 25.26.176 East Devonport 5.9.39.

Claye Sculthorpe set for a 10 goal haul. He currently has eight goals and three points.

Mann, Weeks and Holland among the Demon’s best.

Half time:

Latrobe 14.19.103 East Devonport 4.5.29.

Claye Sculthorpe kicks four goals for the Latrobe and George McLachlan slots two for the Swans.

The visitors held their own and had better of closing stages of the term.

Quarter time:

Latrobe 8.10.58 East Devonport 1.2.8

Swans player Jake Freshney stretchered off mid way through the quarter copping a bump.

Burnie vs Lauderdale

Game finishes as a draw in Hobart: 13.11.89 each.

This story Administrator ready to work first appeared on Nanjing Night Net.

Emergency services unite for Operation Gelita: Photos

Emergency services unite for Operation Gelita: Photos Jackie Sullivan and Bill Gourdry of Tamborine Mountain SES and Chris Cowan of Beaudesert SES were on hand to conduct a mock rescue as part of a combined emergency training operation at the Gelita Processing Plant on Saturday morning.
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Queensland Fire and Emergency Services Scenic Rim station officer and Operation Gelita coordinator Lance Moore discusses the scenario and the location of a mock chemical spill with William Phillips and Ray Innes from the Queensland Fire and Rescue Services scientific branch based at Cannon Hill before the start of Operation Gelita at Josephville on Saturday.

Kooralbyn fire captain Adrian Brinkworth took part in Operation Gelita at the Gelita Processing Plant at Josephville on Saturday morning.

Scenic Rim emergency services gathered for a joint training exercise at the Gelita Processing Plant at Josephville on Saturday morning.

Fire crews were briefed ahead of a joint emergency training exercise at Gelita at Josephville on Saturday morning.

Kooralbyn fire captain Adrian Brinkworth discusses an emergency training exercise with Daniel McHardy of Beaudesert station at Flood Road, Josephville on Saturday morning.

Gelita staff and a variety of emergency crews met at Flood Road, Josephvile ahead of a combined emergency training exercise at the Gelita Processing Plant on Saturday.

Operation Gelita facilitator and Beaudesert station officer Lance Moore instructed emergency crews on what to do during the emergency training operation at the Gelita factory at Josephville on Saturday.

Operation Gelita facilitator and Beaudesert station officer Lance Moore instructed emergency crews on what to do during the emergency training operation at the Gelita factory at Josephville on Saturday.

Gelita Australia safety coordinator Julie Walpole addressed emergency personnel ahead of the Operation Gelita training exercise at Josephville on Saturday.

Beaudesert police constables Duncan Lambie and Andrew Thompson were joined by a dog handler from the police bomb squad at an emergency training exercise at Josephville on Saturday where they were to investigate a suspicious person.

Queensland Police and Emergency Service crews took part in emergency training at Gelita on Saturday.

Queensland Police and Emergency Service crews took part in emergency training at Gelita on Saturday.

Queensland Police and Emergency Service crews took part in emergency training at Gelita on Saturday.

Kooralbyn fire fighters put on their hazmat gear during an emergency training exercise at Gelita on Saturday.

Kooralbyn fire fighters set up a contamination zone for an imagined chemical spill at Gelita during an emergency training operation on Saturday.

Kooralbyn fire fighters set up a contamination zone for an imagined chemical spill at Gelita during an emergency training operation on Saturday.

Kooralbyn fire fighters set up a contamination zone for an imagined chemical spill at Gelita during an emergency training operation on Saturday.

Kooralbyn fire fighters set up a contamination zone for an imagined chemical spill at Gelita during an emergency training operation on Saturday.

Kooralbyn based fire fighter Andrew Tidswell carries a hose during an emergency training exercise at Josephville on Saturday.

Kooralbyn fire fighters put on their hazmat gear during an emergency training exercise at Gelita on Saturday.

Kooralbyn fire fighters put on their hazmat gear during an emergency training exercise at Gelita on Saturday.

Allan Mousallem, who played a chemical spill victim who was doused in hydrochloric acid when there was an explosion while he was doing boiling work at Gelita, is led from the scene by fire fighters for medial treatment to superficial burns. The scenario was part of an emergency training exercise at the Gelita factory on Saturday.

Kooralbyn fire fighters put on their hazmat gear during an emergency training exercise at Gelita on Saturday.

Queensland Police and Emergency Service crews took part in emergency training at Gelita on Saturday.

A dog handler from the Queensland bomb squad brought Lui to take part in an emergency training operation at Gelita on Saturday.

A dog handler from the Queensland bomb squad brought Lui to take part in an emergency training operation at Gelita on Saturday.

A dog handler from the Queensland bomb squad brought Lui to take part in an emergency training operation at Gelita on Saturday.

A dog handler from the Queensland bomb squad brought Lui to take part in an emergency training operation at Gelita on Saturday.

A dog handler from the Queensland bomb squad brought Lui to take part in an emergency training operation at Gelita on Saturday.

A dog handler from the Queensland bomb squad brought Lui to take part in an emergency training operation at Gelita on Saturday.

A dog handler from the Queensland bomb squad brought Lui to take part in an emergency training operation at Gelita on Saturday.

A dog handler from the Queensland bomb squad brought Lui to take part in an emergency training operation at Gelita on Saturday.

Emergency crews took part in a training operation at Gelita, Joesphville on Saturday where they prepared for a scenario involving a chemical spill, injured and missing people, structural fires and grass fires.

Emergency crews took part in a training operation at Gelita, Joesphville on Saturday where they prepared for a scenario involving a chemical spill, injured and missing people, structural fires and grass fires.

Emergency crews took part in a training operation at Gelita, Joesphville on Saturday where they prepared for a scenario involving a chemical spill, injured and missing people, structural fires and grass fires.

Emergency crews took part in a training operation at Gelita, Joesphville on Saturday where they prepared for a scenario involving a chemical spill, injured and missing people, structural fires and grass fires.

Tamborine Mountain fire fighter David Winstow puts on his breathing apparatus for a chemical spill scenario during an emergency training exercise at Gelita on Saturday.

Tamborine Mountain fire fighters help Derek Rogers put on his breathing apparatus during an emergency training exercise at Gelita on Saturday.

Tamborine Fire Fighter Keegan Bunting helps David Winstow into his breathing apparatus during an ermegency training exercise at Josephville on Saturday.

Queensland Police and Emergency Service crews took part in emergency training at Gelita on Saturday.

Queensland Police and Emergency Service crews took part in emergency training at Gelita on Saturday.

Kooralbyn fire fighters Mark Griffiths and Bryce Lockett act as external protecting during a combined training exercise at the Gelita factory on Saturday.

Fire fighters Andrew Tidswell, Wade Suna and Belinda Burrett took part in the emergency training exercise at Gelita on Saturday.

Christopher Pyne removes a dummy that represented a missing worker from the Gelita factory while Melissa Pyne wards off fire. The factory was the site of an imagined explosion, chemical spill and fire as part of an emergency training exercise on Saturday.

Beaudesert fire fighters Christopher Pyne and Melissa Pyne remove a victim from the site of an explosion, chemical spill and fire during a training exercise at Gelita on Saturday.

A victim is rescued by fire fighters and SES personnel during a combined emergency training exercise at Gelita on Saturday.

An SES crew stabilises a victim during an emergency training exercise at Gelita on Saturday.

Fire fighter John Juett took part in an emergency training exercise at Gelita Processing Plant on Saturday.

Woodhill first officer Ben Heilberonn was stationed in a paddock behind the Gelita complex at Josephville on Saturday where the scenario saw his team of rural fire fighters fighting a mock grass fire as part on an emergency training exercise.

Woodhill rural fire fighters Em Rogers and Kieren Webber refill the water during a mock bush fire at Josephville on Saturday.

Woodhill rural fire fighters Burt Headland and Martin Minahan took part in a combined emergency services training exercise at Josephville on Saturday.

Woodhill rural fire fighter Nick Samson helped out during Operation Gelita by fighting an imagined grass fire caused by an explosion at the plant on Saturday.

Andrew Roberts from the Woodhill Rural Fire Station took part in Operation Gelita at Josephville on Saturday.

Woodhill Rural Fire Station members took part in Operation Gelita at Josephville on Saturday.

Nick Baker from Kooralbyn fire station took part in Operation Gelita on Saturday.

Birnam brigade members Duncan Ritter and Karen Dore pack up after operation Gelita on Saturday

Cannon Hill scientific branch station officer Ray Innis shows Scenic Rim Regional Council environmental health officer Monique Kinny the equipment used to determine fumes at chemical spills following Operation Gelita on Saturday.

Beaudesert station officers Col Howell, Chris Pyne, Melissa Pyne and Daniel McHardy took part in Operation Gelita at Josephville on Saturday.

Emergency service personnel and Gelita staff gather for a debrief following a combined training exercise on Saturday.

Scenic Rim emergency crews combined for a group training operation at Gelita on Saturday. Photo by Lance Moore.

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